Personal Finance

Stop Procrastinating And Start Accomplishing Goal$

Image Credits: pixabay.com

One of the greatest English novelists, Charles Dickens, encapsulated the unpleasant prowess of procrastination. His advice was “to never do tomorrow what you can do today. Procrastination is the thief of time.” Procrastination feeds into your weakness by following immediate gratification.

You are aware that it affects some areas of your life such as being late for a meeting or missing the billing deadline. However, you might not realize that constantly avoiding responsibilities can cost you money. Start changing your ways! It may seem trivial now, but keeping your financial goals on hold will affect your long-term savings plan.

LEARN TO ACCEPT YOUR BOUNDS

“I do not feel like doing it right now!”
“I will be more prepared tomorrow.”

How often have you used these excuses to put off the tasks that you can easily accomplish today? For some people, avoiding the difficult tasks by making excuses became a form of coping (i.e., an unhealthy response). It is time to face the music! You will never be fully ready to tackle your financial goals.

The best thing that you can do right now is to examine your financial situation. Identify the amount of cash that comes in and goes out. You may either download money tracker apps or seek the help of the professionals.

CONSIDER THE PRESENT TIME

A study from the University of Chicago found that participants were more likely to initiate action if they view that the task happens at the present. Apply this thought by determining what phase you are on.

Image Credits: pixabay.com

Image Credits: pixabay.com

It is easier to track your tasks by making a simple “to-do list” that even includes the tasks you are avoiding to pursue. Then, write the deadlines together with every task. Even if the deadlines you set are sooner that necessary, it will help your cause.

BREAK IT DOWN INTO SMALL CHUNKS

One of the reasons why individuals put goals aside is its intimidating and overwhelming nature. Listing vague or huge goals can immediately discourage you. Breaking down your financial goals into action items is a good idea. Make these items realistic, manageable, and concrete.

Image Credits: pixabay.com

Image Credits: pixabay.com

For instance, you aim to make S$2,000 by Christmas instead of saying that you envision having S$500,000 by retirement. Set up a reward system after you finish an action item.

Sources: 1 & 2

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