Career & Salary

Shy Employees’ Guide To Negotiating Salary

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Many offices are filled with smooth-takers who can easily say the right words to get what they want. While some people are born to be negotiators, others are somewhat fearful to share their ideas. Fortunately for you, negotiation is a skill that can be shaped with lots of practice.

Start with these tips:

PREPARATION IS THE KEY

When it comes to gaining confidence and bargaining skills, preparation is the key. Arm yourself with the facts by doing thorough research. Do not rely on personal opinions and emotions when negotiating. Instead, you must collect data from multiple reliable sources. Determine the average and maximum salary for a person in your position with a similar level of experience.

DRAW THE OUTCOME

Aside from the facts, you must prepare yourself with the possible outcomes of your actions. What are the possible ways that your employer can respond to your request? What will you do if he or she disagrees? What will you do if he or she agrees?

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Assess every possible outcome and how you will handle these situations. Is what your asking for really worth it?

WRITE A SCRIPT AND REHEARSE IT

Researching is the initial step. What’s next? Planning a script, of course. Having a foundation for the serious conversation can help you to feel more comfortable as it happens. Write at least two scripts to have more options. It is important to note that you have to flexible during the actual discussion.

GO FOR IT

Employees often perceive negotiation as a heated encounter where the clear “winner” shall prevail. In reality, negotiations work best when both parties walk away with satisfaction. Simply asking for what you want (i.e., a pay raise) is half the battle!

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Do not let your shyness be an obstacle to getting what you deserve! Boost your chances of having a positive resolution by being polite and firm. Aim to reflect on your personal growth and foster long-term workplace relationships.

Sources: 1 & 2

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